The Problem Of Suffering - 2 Lessons
The Problem Of Suffering - 2 Lessons
The Problem Of Suffering - 2 Lessons
The Problem Of Suffering - 2 Lessons
The Problem Of Suffering - 2 Lessons

The Problem Of Suffering - 2 Lessons

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Passages: Job 1-2
Big Idea:
Come to God with your pain and suffering and trust him.
Ages: 8-11

Two lessons exploring the book of Job.

The book of Job explores the suffering of Job and the unhelpful counsel he received.

The book is set in an unknown land, far from Israel. There are no clear indications in the book on the period of time it was set.

The suffering of Job raises the question of why God allows suffering. In particular, why bad things happen to good people. The book however does not answer this question. Instead it explores the question of God’s justice.

Job’s constant cry is that he is innocent. This cry is affirmed in chapter 1 where God describes Job as righteous and blameless. The conclusion Job eventually comes to is, if he is innocent, God must therefore be unjust. God refutes Job’s logic. God questions Job’s perspective. Was he there when he made the world? Does he comprehend that this world, although good, is not perfect? That it is full of chaos and danger. Bad things happen to bad people. And bad things happen to good people.

Although the book does not answer the question of why Job suffers, it does make clear that suffering is not always the direct result of sin. Job’s friend counselled the exact opposite. If God is always just, then he will reward those who do good and he will punish those who do evil. They concluded Job was being punished for sins he’d committed. The counsel Job received from his 'so called' friends was resoundly condemned by God. Their logic was too simple for such a complex world and their perspective too limited. The fact was that God sovereignly allowed Satan to inflict suffering on Job to confirm that he loved God for God's sake.

The book ends with Job being affirmed. He repented of his attitude and humbled himself before God. He is also affirmed for his honesty as he wrestled with God about the problem of suffering. The book ends with his life being restored, not as a reward from God, but a gift from God.

In the midst of suffering we, like Job, are invited to trust God’s wisdom and sovereignty.

The unit comes complete with stories, pictures, suggested songs/memory verses, games and drama activities, crafts, large and small group activities. A resource pack of crafts and worksheets is also included.